Boring Bar will not Repeat on Bore Size

July 1st, 2016

A very common concern with any boring bar is that the bar sometimes will not repeat on bored size. This can be caused by one a few different things, or a combination of more than one.

You set your mike and bore a hole and find the hole is oversized, you reset the mike and the next hole is then undersized, obviously there is something that is not right.

First thing we would look for are scores or scratches in the micometer face. If the mike is damaged, the bar will not repeat.The mike should be returned to KW and the face reground and repaired.

Micrometer stem bend, will cause the same problems depending on the amount of bend and the amount of stock to be removed. A quick way to determine if the stem is bent is to insert a feeler gauge (.002) between the face of the mike and the tool bit, then tighten the bit. The feeler gauge should stay in place, and if you slowy rotate the mike in the boring head, the tension in the feeler gauge should not increse or decrease. If it does, the stem is bent and requires replacement.

Another thing to check is if the micrometer not locating into the boring head correctly. The stem of the mike has a V-groove in it which works with a spring loaded ball bearing to insure correct position of the mike into the head every time. If the groove is worn or the ball is out of adjustment, the bar will not repeat on size. The micrometer should "snap" into the head and when slight rearward pressure is applied, the mike should snap back into the boring head. If it does not the ball positon will need to be adjusted. Contact Tech Services for assistance in this case.

If you tighten the tool bit and the tool bit moves away from the feeler gauge, and the feeler becomes loose, there is a different problem. Either the tool gib, tool holder or boring head is worn. You can examine the tool holder quite easily by simply checking the angle where the gib plate contacts the tool holder for visable wear and also feel it for any step. If worn, it will require replacement. You will need to remove the gib from the boring head to examine it for wear also, if the tool holder is worn, it is likely the gib will be worn also.

Boring Bar will not Repeat on Bore Size

The boring head can also be worn, and cause the same problem as the tool gib or holder. If the boring head is worn, then the head will need to be replaced. Rebuilding a boring head is only something that the factory can do, and all heads may not be repairable. A combination of two or more of these concerns may be found on the same machine. These findings are normally on very old or high service units.

These are but a few possible causes for potential boring errors in bore size.

As always please contact KW Tech services for further help if required.

 

Checking Valve Refacer Chuck Runout

February 7th, 2012

Valve Grinder Chuck Inspection

Chuck accuracy is critical to producing a quality valve job.

Most O.E.M.'s require a valve face run-out to be below .0015. To accomplish this, the chuck in a valve grinder must not only run-out below .0015, but must repeat this every time.

High performance engines require even greater accuracy. In some cases run-out must be below .0005.

How do you determine the accuracy of the chuck in your machine? There is basically one easy method that can be used which provides an accurate evaluation.

Start by finding a known round and straight part. A valve seat pilot, carbide if you have one will work very well. If you do not have one, use a section of drill rod that is straight and round. This will be your test piece.

  1. Insert the test piece into the chuck so that it is gripped correctly and has at least two inches of protrusion past the face of the chuck.
  2. Install a dial indicator (.0000 reading if possible) so as to have the plunger contact the test piece one inch from the face of the chuck.
  3. Turn the machine on and observe the indicator as the chuck is rotating. The reading at this point should not exceed .0015.

If the reading is inexcess of the .0015, you can first disassemble the chuck and clean it thoroughly. (Follow directions given in the machine manual). Examine the ramps on which the ball bearings ride, if wear is evident (grooves), the chuck will require placement. Kwik-Way provides new chucks that have less than .0005 run out and for the standard SVSIID and a Hi-Performance version with less than .0002 run out.

If you have any quesitons in regards to chuck performance, or if you need a replacement chuck, contact;

Kwik-Way Tech Services at 800-553-5953.

Formula Carbide for the Lightning Lathe

March 12th, 2013

Formula I Carbide Brake Bits

Kwik-Way uses a special formula for carbide which is design intended for the Model 104 Lightning Lathe, PN 109-1092-32

What is special about the carbide?

  • Our carbide is a special formulation of carbide and additives designed for high speed, high feed machine applicaitons.
  • Our carbide is also coated to improve edge wear and heat resistance providing longer tool life.
  • The radius is larger than on standard brake carbide and provides for smoother surface finishes.
  • We use a positive tool rake, which increases the ability to remove stock at higher feed rates while maintaining excellent surface finishes.

In closing, you can use the 104 carbide technology (insert) on the Model 102 and realize improved surface finishes, and increased tool life.

NOTES:

The 109-1092-32 uses a .032 radii.  This means that the -32 has the potential to provide a smoother surface finish. (Standard inserts normally use a .016 in radii)

Positive rake tools can not be turned over, but they can be switched from side to side, which can potentially double the life (number of rotor surfaces) of the tool.

Micrometer Calibration for all Kwik-Way Model Boring Bars

February 1st, 2012

From time to time it may become necessary to re-calibrate your boring bar micrometer. Kwik-Way can not calibrate  your micrometer here at our facility due to the fact that it must be calibrated to the boring bar that it is used in.

Please follow the the instructions carefully and your micrometer will be re-calibrated and accurate again within minutes.

Model FW-II Pictured Click Here for More Info

1. Using a scrap block, center the boring bar to the cylinder to be bored, and tighten the base clamp screw.

2. Raise the boring bar up to allow the tool holder and bit to be installed into the boring head.

3  With the tool holder and bit pushed back into the boring head as far as it will go, tighten the gib set screw. Now lower the boring head until the the tool bit is just into the top of the bore.

4.  Loosen the bib screw and allow the tool to carefully come out and contact the cylinerbore. Tighten the gib screw.

5.  Raise the boring head to allow the boring bar mike to be inserted into the boring head. NOTE: Have the micrometer adjusted large enough so that the tool bit will not contact the face on insertion.

6.  Slowly rotate the micrometer spindle untl the face of the mike JUST touches the tool bit. Now remove the micrometer and advance the reading by .010 to .015, then tighten the micrometer lock screw.

7.  Insert the micromenter back into the boring head and loosen the gib set screw to allow the tool bit to contact the face.(Use caution so as no to have the tool bit scratch the face of the micrometer) Tighten the gib set screw.

8.  Bore the cylinder.... now measure the actual finished size. DO NOT  loosen or remove the boring bar. Take the measurement with the bar in place.

9.  Place the stem of the boring bar micrometer into a vise with soft jaws so as not to damage the stem. Loosen the allen set screw found in the rear os the mike thimble in the knurled area.

10. Carefully rotate the thimble so that the mike now reads your bore size. Tighten the set screw.

11. Now loosen the micrometer lock screw and rotate the thimble either clockwise or counter clockwise, whichever direction is closer to thimble "0". Now re-tighten the micrometr lock screw at "0". If necessary, loosen the thimble set screw and slip the thimble up or down until the 0 is on the appropriate black line on the body of the micrometer then tighten the thimble set screw.

12. Loosen the micrometer lock screw and rotate the thimble to the reading of  the bore size in your test cylinder. Now add .010 to the reading and rebore the cylinder. Measure the cylinder to verify size, fine tune your micrometer reading if necessary.

Valve Chuck Disassembly / Assembly Instructions

January 31st, 2012

4mm Valve Chuck Disassembly / Assembly Tool

PN: 012-1054-60

[This tool is required to perform the following operations]


Disassembly Instructions

STEP 1: Remove the chuck cover from the Chuck Bearing Assembly, being careful not to pull any wires from the cover.. Rotate the Chuck so that the Grind Mark on the front collar and the Yellow Mark on the Spring are Vertical as show in the photo below.

STEP 2: Remove the (3) three 8 x 32 x 5/16 slot head screws from the Chuck End Cap (Black) shown below.

STEP 3: Use the Disassembly Tool (picture at the top of this document) which is standard equipment with your machine, put the 8 x 32 screws (3) into the chuck shaft in a 1/4 of an inch. Put the 1/4 x 20 Hex Head Bolt finger tight against the End Plate.

STEP 4: Remove the Chuck Yoke.

STEP 5: Loosen the 1/4 x 20 Hex head bolt counter clockwise. As you release the 1/4 x 20 bolt, the spring pressure should begin to release.. NOTE: You may need to soak the chuck in Automatic Transmission Fluid to remove grit and make the collars slide easier.

STEP 6: Remove the Chuck Disassembly Tool.

STEP 7: Begin to remove the outer collar from the chuck shaft. Next, remove the Loading Cup with the Four (4) springs. The large spring and inner collar will be removed along with the Thrust Step Washer. As you take the Inner collar off the steel chuck balls(9/16) may fall out of the chuck shaft.

STEP 8: Remove the Chuck Handwheel and belt from the chuck shaft. Remove the chuck from the chuck bearing assembly. Clean all parts with a parts cleaning solvent.


Assembly Instructions

STEP 9: (1) Put the shaft back in the chuck bearing slide, use transmission fluid only and coat the chuck shaft. Make sure the keys are vertical.

(2) Put the thrust washer, spring, and (3) three rear balls back on the chuck shaft, making sure that the Yellow mark is lined up with the Keys. hold on to the bottom balls so they don't fall out of the shaft.

(3) Slide on the Inner collar, so all three rear balls are inside of the collar.

(4) Put the front set of balls in the shaft. Install the loading cup with four(4) springs facing out.

(5) Install the outer collar, making sure the grind mark is lined up with the keyways.

(6) Reinstall the Disassembly tool. Put the three screws (8 x 32) in one quarter (1/4) of an inch. Begin to tighten the 1/4 x 20 bolt, making sure that the collars are still lined up with the keys. Run 1/4 x 20 bolt in until it is tight.

(7) Reinstall the Chuck Yoke.

(8) Remove the Disassembly Tool and reinstall the chuck End Cap with the three 8 x 32 screws.

(9) Reinstall the chuck Handwheel and Belt, making sure the chuck and chuck handwheel are snug to the chuck bearing slide.

(10) Reinstall the chuck cover. Make sure there are no wires touching the chuck.