Kwik-Way History

February 22nd, 2017
Kwik-Way History

Kwik-Way Industries, Inc., began as the Cedar Rapids Engineering Company in 1920, providing a product sorely needed by the fledg­ling automobile and truck indus­try—a reliable, standardized way to reface engine valves. Until the Kwik-Way valve refacing machine was marketed, that process was per­formed, with difficulty, by hand. Charles C. Hahn, founder of the company, was a former blacksmith's apprentice who appreciated auto­mobiles and wanted to solve some of their engine problems, such as valves warped by heat and wear. He queried machine tool makers around the country who not only lacked a lathe "chuck" to fit his needs but flatly told Hahn that such a tool couldn't be built. 

Hahn persevered, however, and with R.H. Meister, an experienced machinist, founded Cedar Rapids Engineering Company. The partners hired a creative mechanical engineer, A.I. Dunn, and between them, the trio designed the chuck needed to reface engine valves. The device worked and the Kwik-Way valve facing machine was born.

The firm's first modest office and shop was located at 902 Seven­ teenth Street Northeast in Cedar Rapids, and measured only 20 by 20 feet. However, the new product caught on fast throughout the United States and the business grew. The company's first salesman was I.R. Goodwin, an energetic young man who made his money the hard way—covering the dusty roads of Nebraska, North and South Dakota, and northwestern Iowa by automo­bile, peddling his wares primarily to garages.

During World War II, Cedar Rapids Engineering Company put its close-tolerance machining skills to work grinding radio crystals for the Allied defense effort. As the com­pany continued to expand, an eye was cast toward foreign markets. Although some sales had been made overseas almost by accident, it wasn't until 1962 that Kwik-Way machines were marketed abroad directly by Cedar Rapids Engineer­ing Company. That year, overseas sales totaled $68,000; today, that annual figure amounts to several million dollars.

After Charles Hahn's death in the 1940s, control of the enterprise was assumed, first by his partner, R.H. Meister, and then by Hahn's two sons, F. Critz and H. Cedric. In 1968, Cedar Rapids Engineering Company was merged into the newly formed Kwik-Way Industries, Inc., headed by Thomas A. Parks and a new professional management team. The company acquired a Canadian firm in 1969, now called Kwik - Way Manufacturing of Canada, Ltd. In late 1973, Material Products Company, a steel fabricat­ing firm, and Line-O-Tronics, Inc., maker of auto front-end alignment tools and wheel balancers, were ac­quired. Today Kwik-Way manufac­tures the automotive industry's most complete line of repair machinery.

A large industrial facility was built and occupied at 500 Fifty-seventh Street, Marion, in 1976. In 1 9 8 0 , the company employs approximately 300 people through its Marion facility, 140 at Rock Is­land, Illinois, and 50 at its facility at Toronto, Canada.

Valve Chuck Disassembly / Assembly Instructions

January 31st, 2012

4mm Valve Chuck Disassembly / Assembly Tool

PN: 012-1054-60

[This tool is required to perform the following operations]


Disassembly Instructions

STEP 1: Remove the chuck cover from the Chuck Bearing Assembly, being careful not to pull any wires from the cover.. Rotate the Chuck so that the Grind Mark on the front collar and the Yellow Mark on the Spring are Vertical as show in the photo below.

STEP 2: Remove the (3) three 8 x 32 x 5/16 slot head screws from the Chuck End Cap (Black) shown below.

STEP 3: Use the Disassembly Tool (picture at the top of this document) which is standard equipment with your machine, put the 8 x 32 screws (3) into the chuck shaft in a 1/4 of an inch. Put the 1/4 x 20 Hex Head Bolt finger tight against the End Plate.

STEP 4: Remove the Chuck Yoke.

STEP 5: Loosen the 1/4 x 20 Hex head bolt counter clockwise. As you release the 1/4 x 20 bolt, the spring pressure should begin to release.. NOTE: You may need to soak the chuck in Automatic Transmission Fluid to remove grit and make the collars slide easier.

STEP 6: Remove the Chuck Disassembly Tool.

STEP 7: Begin to remove the outer collar from the chuck shaft. Next, remove the Loading Cup with the Four (4) springs. The large spring and inner collar will be removed along with the Thrust Step Washer. As you take the Inner collar off the steel chuck balls(9/16) may fall out of the chuck shaft.

STEP 8: Remove the Chuck Handwheel and belt from the chuck shaft. Remove the chuck from the chuck bearing assembly. Clean all parts with a parts cleaning solvent.


Assembly Instructions

STEP 9: (1) Put the shaft back in the chuck bearing slide, use transmission fluid only and coat the chuck shaft. Make sure the keys are vertical.

(2) Put the thrust washer, spring, and (3) three rear balls back on the chuck shaft, making sure that the Yellow mark is lined up with the Keys. hold on to the bottom balls so they don't fall out of the shaft.

(3) Slide on the Inner collar, so all three rear balls are inside of the collar.

(4) Put the front set of balls in the shaft. Install the loading cup with four(4) springs facing out.

(5) Install the outer collar, making sure the grind mark is lined up with the keyways.

(6) Reinstall the Disassembly tool. Put the three screws (8 x 32) in one quarter (1/4) of an inch. Begin to tighten the 1/4 x 20 bolt, making sure that the collars are still lined up with the keys. Run 1/4 x 20 bolt in until it is tight.

(7) Reinstall the Chuck Yoke.

(8) Remove the Disassembly Tool and reinstall the chuck End Cap with the three 8 x 32 screws.

(9) Reinstall the chuck Handwheel and Belt, making sure the chuck and chuck handwheel are snug to the chuck bearing slide.

(10) Reinstall the chuck cover. Make sure there are no wires touching the chuck.

Safety and Dressing Guide for Seat Grinder Wheels

January 9th, 2013

The Kwik-Way Heavy Duty Wheel Dresser

WHEELS commonly referred to as Seat Grinding Stones or Rocks.

The most common cause of wheel breakage is due to improper mounting and abusive and/or careless  operation.  Only  through  proper  use,  regular  grinding machine  maintenance,  service  and inspection procedures can wheel breakage be prevented.
 
It  is  the  responsibility  of  the  user  to  inspect,  at  regular  intervals,  to  be  certain  that  mounting flanges are in usable condition, are of proper size and shape and that no damage has occurred to the wheel or the machine.
 
The following DO'S and DONT'S should be used as a guide to safer grinding

DO's DON'Ts
CHECK all wheels for CRACKS or other
DAMAGE before mounting.
DON'T USE wheels WHICH HAVE BEEN
DROPPED or otherwise damaged.
USE MOUNTING BLOTTERS when
supplied with wheels
DON'T USE EXCESSIVE PRESSURE
WHEN MOUNTING wheel.  Tighten nut only
enough to hold wheel firmly.
Be sure WHEEL HOLE, threaded or
unthreaded, FITS machine arbor
PROPERLY and that flanges are clean, flat
and of the proper type for the wheel you
are mounting.
DON'T USE HEAVY GRINDING
PRESSURE
Always RUN WHEEL WITH GUARD IN
PLACE at least one minute before grinding
(wheel dresser).
 
Always WEAR PROTECTIVE SAFETY
GLASSES or proper face shield.
 
Wear a DUST RESPIRATOR, as dust
conditions are present in most grinding
operations
 

WARNING
IMPROPER USE MAY CAUSE BREAKAGE AND SERIOUS INJURY.

 

KWIK-WAY WHEEL DRESSER SET-UP

  1. Loosen handle #3 and rotate the pointer line until it aligns to the index angle desired and retighten.
  2. After attaching the correct grinding wheel to the grinder unit, carefully lower the grinder unit onto the dresser arbor item #1
  3. Loosen item #5 and raise or lower the arbor until the face of the wheel is in relative position to the diamond (#6). Retighten # 5
  4. Adjust the diamond #6 by turning the knurled knob #2 until the diamond is nearly in contact to the face of the grinding wheel.
  5. Engage the grinder motor hex drive to the hex cap on the grinder unit start the motor and begin  dressing  the  wheel  using  handle  #  4  and  slowly  sweeping  the  face.  (Follow  the directions below)

DRESSING OR TRUING THE VALVE SEAT WHEEL

It is necessary to true or dress seat wheels that have become dull or loaded, or have lost their form (angle). To obtain the best possible dress, observe the following.

  1. Feed the diamond into the wheel very slowly until the diamond just touches the wheel.
  2. Move the diamond across the face of the wheel beginning from the bottom and sweep up.  A slow sweep will provide a smoother finish while a rapid sweep will provide a coarse finish. 

NOTE: How  the  wheel  is  dressed  will  directly  influence the finish of the valve seat. Take care when dressing the seat wheels, this will improve valve seat finish and increase diamond life. Check the  dress  of  the  wheel  frequently  during  the  seat  grinding  operation.  It  is  better  to  dress frequently and remove a slight amount of wheel than to wait too long and have a necessity to remove an excessive amount to correct the wheel 

Changing a valve seat stone angle is only advised if it is to increase the stone angle, i.e., taking a 15-degree angle wheel and making it a 30-degree. 

It is not cost effective to attempt to reduce an angle, too much abrasive and diamond is required to perform this operation. 

Micrometer Calibration for all Kwik-Way Model Boring Bars

February 1st, 2012

From time to time it may become necessary to re-calibrate your boring bar micrometer. Kwik-Way can not calibrate  your micrometer here at our facility due to the fact that it must be calibrated to the boring bar that it is used in.

Please follow the the instructions carefully and your micrometer will be re-calibrated and accurate again within minutes.

Model FW-II Pictured Click Here for More Info

1. Using a scrap block, center the boring bar to the cylinder to be bored, and tighten the base clamp screw.

2. Raise the boring bar up to allow the tool holder and bit to be installed into the boring head.

3  With the tool holder and bit pushed back into the boring head as far as it will go, tighten the gib set screw. Now lower the boring head until the the tool bit is just into the top of the bore.

4.  Loosen the bib screw and allow the tool to carefully come out and contact the cylinerbore. Tighten the gib screw.

5.  Raise the boring head to allow the boring bar mike to be inserted into the boring head. NOTE: Have the micrometer adjusted large enough so that the tool bit will not contact the face on insertion.

6.  Slowly rotate the micrometer spindle untl the face of the mike JUST touches the tool bit. Now remove the micrometer and advance the reading by .010 to .015, then tighten the micrometer lock screw.

7.  Insert the micromenter back into the boring head and loosen the gib set screw to allow the tool bit to contact the face.(Use caution so as no to have the tool bit scratch the face of the micrometer) Tighten the gib set screw.

8.  Bore the cylinder.... now measure the actual finished size. DO NOT  loosen or remove the boring bar. Take the measurement with the bar in place.

9.  Place the stem of the boring bar micrometer into a vise with soft jaws so as not to damage the stem. Loosen the allen set screw found in the rear os the mike thimble in the knurled area.

10. Carefully rotate the thimble so that the mike now reads your bore size. Tighten the set screw.

11. Now loosen the micrometer lock screw and rotate the thimble either clockwise or counter clockwise, whichever direction is closer to thimble "0". Now re-tighten the micrometr lock screw at "0". If necessary, loosen the thimble set screw and slip the thimble up or down until the 0 is on the appropriate black line on the body of the micrometer then tighten the thimble set screw.

12. Loosen the micrometer lock screw and rotate the thimble to the reading of  the bore size in your test cylinder. Now add .010 to the reading and rebore the cylinder. Measure the cylinder to verify size, fine tune your micrometer reading if necessary.

Formula Carbide for the Lightning Lathe

March 12th, 2013

Formula I Carbide Brake Bits

Kwik-Way uses a special formula for carbide which is design intended for the Model 104 Lightning Lathe, PN 109-1092-32

What is special about the carbide?

  • Our carbide is a special formulation of carbide and additives designed for high speed, high feed machine applicaitons.
  • Our carbide is also coated to improve edge wear and heat resistance providing longer tool life.
  • The radius is larger than on standard brake carbide and provides for smoother surface finishes.
  • We use a positive tool rake, which increases the ability to remove stock at higher feed rates while maintaining excellent surface finishes.

In closing, you can use the 104 carbide technology (insert) on the Model 102 and realize improved surface finishes, and increased tool life.

NOTES:

The 109-1092-32 uses a .032 radii.  This means that the -32 has the potential to provide a smoother surface finish. (Standard inserts normally use a .016 in radii)

Positive rake tools can not be turned over, but they can be switched from side to side, which can potentially double the life (number of rotor surfaces) of the tool.